Anonymous asked: Hello, I've been having this issue for a while and was wondering if you or your followers could help me out. As an artist I usually sketch/draw/paint from reference, even when it comes to coming up with original ideas I need to look up a pose or object to transpose it better. I'd really like to just envision something and be able to bring it to paper better... so would there be any advice on that? ty xx

art-and-sterf:

you’re on your way now. reference is the tool to be able to do that. eventually, after referencing something countless times you’ll have expanded your visual library to the point where you’ll be able to do what I call “pulling it out of my butt”

I have drawn so many ribcages and skulls by reference that I can just plop pretty accurate ones right on the page, and it comes from 2 years of referencing them and drawing them pretty constantly. from them I have also learned the basics of perspective and I’ve learned about line weight and how to portray solid objects using only line. it’ll come to you anon c: you just gotta wait until you have referenced something so much that you can pull it out your booty.

———

Hey! Admin Tina here!

So I come across this problem as well, until I found this youtube video. This guy is really awesome when it comes to concept ideas and what not. Explore his channel a bit too, you might find something else that’s helpful.

Also what would probably help you is going to pixelovely and gesture drawing the poses. The more you see, the more you can do on your own. Do the 30 second poses so you force yourself to quickly draw out poses. We make up from out minds what we see in life.

15 April 2014 ·

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

(via webcomicdojo)

12 April 2014 ·

NFB StopMo Studio on the App Store on iTunes

Looks fun!

11 April 2014 ·

lovelynobody00:

this took like five minutes to do and thats how easy it should be. hope this helps in anyway?

(Source: bumbleshark, via art-and-sterf)

10 April 2014 ·

whethervane:

kanotynes:

btw If you really do want to learn to animate, don’t follow my advice just read this: http://www.scribd.com/doc/5445343/the-animators-survival-kit-richard-williams

HOLY SHITTTTT A PDF OF THE ENTIRE GODDAMN BOOK!!!! EVERYONE WHO WANTS TO LEARN TO ANIMATE SHOULD READ THIS

(via art-and-sterf)

9 April 2014 ·

lalondes-wonking:

image

This is for you, Nose Anon!

Honestly, I suck at tutorials. I really, really do. This is my first one since…forever ago [and back then I sucked worse so that doesn’t even count] and it was kind of just a quick “Let’s see what I DO know and see if I have any idea how to convey that coherently, or maybe it’ll just explode in my face”

SO HERE YOU GO! All I know about drawing noses freehand in an almost-tutorial…ish…thing. Maybe.

(Source: hella-bara, via art-and-sterf)

5 April 2014 ·

10 typical perspective errors

helpyoudraw:

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid…

Nice!

3 April 2014 ·

skrelp:

[x][x][x][x][x][x][x][x][x]

(via art-and-sterf)

1 April 2014 ·

harteus:

i’ve had a few people asking me for skin colouring advices, so i decided to just touch upon the subject and show how i generally paint it, without going too much in depth, nor telling you “how to do it!!!” these are just some tips i’ve found useful, and it’s all really simple. 

there are some minor lightning differences in the faces, but none of them are especially hard to work out, it’s mostly very straight-forward lightning. colour of course works differently in different settings, so this is just super simplified.

i hope i was able to help somewhat! i still feel so strange offering art advices, because i know i’m in need of those too.

(via art-and-sterf)

1 April 2014 ·

helpyoudraw:

http://characterdesignnotes.blogspot.com/2010/10/foot-reference.html

helpyoudraw:

http://characterdesignnotes.blogspot.com/2010/10/foot-reference.html

(Source: old-helpyoudraw, via art-and-sterf)

27 March 2014 ·

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

(via starexorcist)

27 March 2014 ·

kateordie:

Okay, bear with me for a second. I dealt with some crappy stuff this weekend, and some “jokes” that really upset me. It kind of got me down. Comics have been so good to me, and indie comics / webcomics / the group I mostly deal with are so welcoming. Sometimes, though, the older guys in this business have no idea when to quit, or what’s acceptable to say.
I ended up, a few times, being the only female creator in a group of men who’ve been in this business a long time. I heard stuff I didn’t want to hear, was expected to laugh at things I didn’t like, and essentially had to play nice with people while they acted like bigots.
I was feeling down, and really self-conscious. Then, this movie comes on TV. This silly movie! The last night of my trip. I hadn’t seen it in years. I forgot the message. I had no idea how much I needed it.
I’m a blonde, blue-eyed college drop-out. People don’t always take me seriously. I get that. They laugh at me or flirt with me, and all it makes me want to do is try harder. Be better. Succeed on my own damn merit.
I have no time for the boys’ club. I have comics to make.

I’m sorry that happened to you. It’s a shame that the institution of the comics convention so often throws together groups of creators and fans who, apart from the medium they create or consume, might otherwise have nothing in common and no reason to associate with each other. There ought to be a better way to promote one’s work and interact with peers. There are good cons, of course, just like there are good comic shops, but unfortunately they are the exception and not the rule.
Keep kicking ass.

kateordie:

Okay, bear with me for a second. I dealt with some crappy stuff this weekend, and some “jokes” that really upset me. It kind of got me down. Comics have been so good to me, and indie comics / webcomics / the group I mostly deal with are so welcoming. Sometimes, though, the older guys in this business have no idea when to quit, or what’s acceptable to say.

I ended up, a few times, being the only female creator in a group of men who’ve been in this business a long time. I heard stuff I didn’t want to hear, was expected to laugh at things I didn’t like, and essentially had to play nice with people while they acted like bigots.

I was feeling down, and really self-conscious. Then, this movie comes on TV. This silly movie! The last night of my trip. I hadn’t seen it in years. I forgot the message. I had no idea how much I needed it.

I’m a blonde, blue-eyed college drop-out. People don’t always take me seriously. I get that. They laugh at me or flirt with me, and all it makes me want to do is try harder. Be better. Succeed on my own damn merit.

I have no time for the boys’ club. I have comics to make.

I’m sorry that happened to you. It’s a shame that the institution of the comics convention so often throws together groups of creators and fans who, apart from the medium they create or consume, might otherwise have nothing in common and no reason to associate with each other. There ought to be a better way to promote one’s work and interact with peers. There are good cons, of course, just like there are good comic shops, but unfortunately they are the exception and not the rule.

Keep kicking ass.

(Source: 90sbiitch)

26 March 2014 ·

mothsbymoonlight:

Tutorial - Curves on Girls by *Ai-Bee
For the anon asking about curves months ago, and for anyone else that could use any points on the subject!*
*NOT AN EXPERT THO

Comics in general could use some variety in body shapes (I know mine can).

mothsbymoonlight:

Tutorial - Curves on Girls by *Ai-Bee

For the anon asking about curves months ago, and for anyone else that could use any points on the subject!*

*NOT AN EXPERT THO

Comics in general could use some variety in body shapes (I know mine can).

(via art-and-sterf)

26 March 2014 ·

skellybeans:

arandadill:

Hip Tips

all of my please and thank you’s

Excellent anatomy tips.

skellybeans:

arandadill:

Hip Tips

all of my please and thank you’s

Excellent anatomy tips.

(via art-and-sterf)

25 March 2014 ·

psychokineticex asked: Been meaning to ask this for a bit, but what sort of computers and tablets would you recommend for someone looking to get into webcomics? I've been looking for a while, but I've honestly never been sure where to start, so I figured I'd ask an actual web cartoonist.

itswalky:

hijinksensue:

itswalky:

I’m not sure what I’d recommend for someone looking to “get into” webcomics.  The thing I use right now is, like, a $2500 Cintiq.  That’s not really an entry point.  

But before that, I just used pencil and paper and scanned it into Photoshop 5 and used a mouse to color it.

So, uh.

Since David insists on not being a reliable resource for aspiring cartoonists, I’ll just go ahead and tackle this one. 

Computer: 

Literally any computer made in the last 5 years that somewhat exceeds the minimum requirements for your graphics app of choice. Photoshop runs really well on a Core2Duo Mac from 2009 (as this was my primary work machine until last week). Similarly, it should run well on a PC with the same specs. More power is certainly better, but more RAM is more important if you have to choose one. Photoshop CS5 runs well with 4gb of RAM, but it runs MUCH better with 8gb. An SSD drive will also drastically improve Photoshop performance. 

Tablet:

As for tablets, I’d start with an entry level Huion or Monoprice tablet. They work as well (often better) than comparably sized Wacom tablets and ofter cost 1/8th the price. I recommend the Huion H610 from personal experience. Amazon has them for $60. Read the reviews to make sure it’s right for you. 

If you want to just straight into the world of “monitors you can draw directly on” don’t bother saving up for a Wacom Cintiq (at least not for your first tablet monitor). Start with something MUCH More affordable, like a Yiynova MSP19U or the Monoprice 19” Tablet Monitor/Huion GT-190 (you can see my detailed review HERE). These models lack some of the features and polish of the Cintiqs, but the barrier to entry is significantly reduced due to the $400-$600 price tag vs. Wacom’s $2000+. Tablet monitor drawing it’s for everyone, so don’t break the bank before you figure out if you even like the experience of using a device like this. Stay away from Bosto Kingtee monitors. They seem to have prettier industrial design than Yiynova or Monoprice, but their customer service is notoriously horrendous. 

Software:

I mentioned Photoshop because that’s what I’ve always used, but conventional wisdom says don’t buy a $600 program when you’re just starting out. Start with Manga Studio. It’s often on sale for $50 and most professional comic artists seem to be switching from PS to MS these days due to it’s superior brush engine and litany of tools designed SPECIFICALLY for making comics. 

Hope that helps. 

reblogging this because i don’t know what any of these words mean but they at least look superficially real to an uneducated observer

Good advice for the beginning digital artist. I use a late 2008 MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM and a 256 GB SSD drive that I put in myself. I have a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet and have been a happy Manga Studio user for several years. Wouldn’t mind getting a Cintiq or Yiynova one day but am in no great rush.

24 March 2014 ·

Who?

Scott Marshall is a writer/artist based in Kingston, ON.

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