Friends of Tumblr, May I Ask Your Input?

kwmurphy:

mattgourley:

I’m working on a new project and need suggestions of actors who were present in classic/great/memorable scenes from cinema but had no lines - or perhaps just one or two lines. The point being, they weren’t the focus but were on screen in some way during the most memorable movie (or possibly…

Baron Harkonnen’s assistants, eyes and ears stitched shut, in the Baron’s lair on Giedi Prime, in David Lynch’s adaptation of Dune

Marcel Marceau in Mel Brooks’ Silent Movie, and Basil Hoffman (as Herb) in My Favorite Year.

11 September 2014 ·

toastyhat:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

evora-eriu-mclaggen:

x There. I was too weak to color it. Guess I just wanted to share it too much…

DAAAAAAMMMMMMMNNN!

this is mindblowing oh my goodness

Nice! 

toastyhat:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

evora-eriu-mclaggen:

x There. I was too weak to color it. Guess I just wanted to share it too much…

DAAAAAAMMMMMMMNNN!

this is mindblowing oh my goodness

Nice! 

(via art-and-sterf)

10 September 2014 ·

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

Brilliant!

(via art-and-sterf)

10 September 2014 ·

devkimiko:

Part 1 of my continuing series on printing! Today we look at colour and that oft asked question of “Why do my prints looks so different from the screen what happened”. Part 2 covers DPI and file setup, and Part 3 looks at making PDFs in InDesign.

Good advice for those who need guidance on converting digital art for print!

(via art-and-sterf)

9 September 2014 ·

conceptcookie:

The getting Started Course is here, go check it out here: http://cgcookie.com/concept/cgc-courses/getting-started-in-digital-art/

I went all-digital (apart from sketchbooks) a few years ago and haven’t looked back. Highly recommended.

(via art-and-sterf)

9 September 2014 ·

whinecraft:

ive been asked a few times how i draw back-views, especially for character sheets so i wanted to share a little trick I learned a while back that’s really really helpful especially if you’re used to drawing things from the front and need help getting the proportions right from the back view.

You don’t ALWAYS have to do this the way that I do; The only reason I put effort into the front view is because this is going to be a character sheet and I need the front view to be fleshed out.

But alternatively; Just sketch out a sillhouette, then fill it in on a higher layer. 

Sorry if someones already done this before im just answering a frequently asked question ;w;

Very cool!

(via art-and-sterf)

4 September 2014 ·

"An artist of any sort… you must not put down the man before you. It’s like putting down the guy who built the ladder you’re standing on. Without him, you’re standing on the floor. With him, naturally you’re above him, because he’s holding you on his shoulders. You devour his stuff. You eat it up. And then you move one step higher. A lot of cartoonists, I’ll take all the originality they’ve got, and all their ideas, and swallow them, and then I’ll try to move one step further. That doesn’t mean I could’ve done it without their influence or their help. Because, eventually, some guy’s going to be standing on my shoulders…"

~ Shel Silverstein, in a wonderful interview with Studs Terkel (via austinkleon)

2 September 2014 ·

austinkleon:

Neil Gaiman, The Sandman

A young lady at Dragon’s Lair comics here in Austin talked me into buying the first volume, and when I got the whole stack from the library, another young lady at the checkout desk looked at the stack with approval and asked, “First time?”

It took me about two months to get through all ten volumes — read them only before bed, which did, unsurprisingly, have an effect on my dreams.

Sandman was a DC comics character that Gaiman resurrected for the series:

They said: make it your own. So I started thinking more mythic – let’s have someone who’s been around since the beginning of time, because that lets me play around with the whole of time and space. I inherited from mythology the idea that he was Morpheus, king of dreams: it’s a story about stories, and why we need them, all of them revolving in some way around Morpheus: we encounter a frustrated writer with an imprisoned muse; we attend a serial killer convention and the first performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream; we even find out what cats dream about (and why we should be afraid).

I have to admit, one thing I find very disorienting about reading the series, especially reading it all in one big gulp, is the rotating cast of artists. I find that when reading comics made by a bunch of different artists (different penciler, inker, colorist, etc.) there’s a kind of lack of visual unity that just puts things off a little. Characters sometimes don’t look like themselves, and it can be hard to track visually what’s going on. (Which makes me appreciate collaborations like Saga and From Hell all the more.)

Dave McKean, who did all the covers, alludes to this:

Since the interior artists changed all the time, I was the only consistent visual element. I wanted the covers to be a filter, a window of slightly surreal, melancholy, thoughtful imagery to pass through… Some covers were painted, some drawn, but many of the first few were 5ft-high collage-type works made by me that we took to a high-res photography studio to shoot – this was all pre-computers.

McKean’s covers are really worth browsing through (here are some of his favorites and a dedicated volume).

I actually wish there was a way (other than owning the original comics) to replicate the serialized experience of reading the individual issues. I’d like a series that was just the original comics, with ads and everything, bound together. These trade paperbacks I read had the covers, but everything was sort of squashed together, and it was hard to tell where one issue began and one ended. I suppose you could download the original scans on bittorrent or something.

It’s fun to swallow it all in one gulp, but I can only imagine how cool it was to read these individually, in their original context, back in the day. Saga is the first comic I’ve read for which I’ve actually gone to the comic book store to get new issues, and it’s a really fun experience.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

I jumped on with issue 3 and went back and caught up quickly, reading it issue by issue afterward. At first it didn’t seem like it would be any more special a series than its “new format” contemporaries (it actually preceded the Vertigo imprint) such as Hellblazer or Wasteland. The turning point for me was the story that introduces Death, and not long after the rest of the Endless. As someone who grew up reading daft 70s comics I enjoyed Gaiman’s many callbacks to House of Mystery mixed in so effortlessly with much older myths, history, fairy tales, and just plain imagination. The letter column was unusually thoughtful for comics. The variety of artists was sometimes aggravating but I generally felt they suited their assignments.

After it was done, in the early days of eBay I sold my complete run to some chap in Japan. While I suppose a reprint that includes all of the house ads and letters might be interesting, I would think it would not actually be all that expensive to just buy a set in the same way if you want that experience, especially compared to buying all of the deluxe editions that have come since. That said, I’m sure Mr. Gaiman and the artists would much prefer the royalties from people buying the nice new colour-corrected versions… ;)

29 August 2014 ·

amanofletters said: When you first got into comics, did you feel like you were better at, or more interested in, the drawing or the writing? I want to make my own comics, but I feel like my art straggles behind my writing. How can I cause these two aspects of comic-making to come together within myself, and make the works I want to make?

scarygoround:

faitherinhicks:

Oh hey, this is something I think a lot about, actually! So when I started making comics (15 years ago this month, haha), I was really terrible at drawing. And I wanted to do, y’know, GRAPHIC NOVELS, with fairly realistically drawn characters and backgrounds and things that are hard to draw. Things that I didn’t really have the skills to draw at the time. So I’d draw my comics and the art was generally pretty terrible. But I was comfortable with writing, and that helped me keep going with making comics, because I enjoyed the storytelling aspect of them so much. 

It’s hard when you feel pretty okay about your writing but your art doesn’t measure up. I kind of feel like my art still doesn’t measure up to what I want it to be (mostly right now I want it to be Hiromu Arakawa, which will never happen, no matter how much I practice), but I’m very comfortable with the writing part of comics, so I look at that as my great strength in my work. It makes up for where my art is lacking, and I work hard at writing to make the sum total of my work better than if I was just writing or just drawing.

I mean, the absolute best thing about comics (to me) is that you don’t need to be a spectacular artist to make really great, involving comics. I’m not an amazing technical artist. During my down times, I don’t draw gorgeous illustrations or do amazing paintings (I kind of dislike doing that kind of thing, to be honest). I will never be Gillian Tamaki. But I’m good at storytelling, and I’m good at interpreting emotion and drawing that on the comic page. So I work to my strengths, which is making stories about engaging characters, and laying out scenes where there is a lot of emotion running through them, and people who like my comics don’t seem to mind that my art is not as great as Gillian Tamaki or Hiromu Arakawa.

Comics aren’t just art or just writing, they’re the two combined to make something new and wonderful. They are more than the sum of their parts. So work hard to because a decent artist with a good grasp of storytelling basics (this is super important!), and work harder to become a truly excellent writer and storyteller, and you can quite possibly make great comics! It worked for me. :)

This describes my experience almost exactly.

Good advice from one of my favourite young artists.

28 August 2014 ·

yxxz:

i’ve never seen police throw tear gas or shoot rubber bullets at Westboro Baptist protestors. 

It would be GREAT if they could start!

(via lilibat)

15 August 2014 ·

conceptcookie:

With over 150 votes, this was the top tutorial request and now you can watch the tutorials on creating clothing wrinkles and fabric folding! 
http://cgcookie.com/concept/cgc-courses/realisticwrinkles_foldingfabric/

V cool.

(via art-and-sterf)

13 August 2014 ·

explore-blog:

Art, Inc. – a field guide to the psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist 

Having a productive mindset, and defining the success of a finished piece of art in both aesthetic and commercial terms, is an excellent goal to strive for. So many of us struggle with granting ourselves permission to be an artist. If you’re doing the same, let me fix that for you. Do you want to be an artist? Yes? Congratulations, you’re now an artist. Now go make your art.

explore-blog:

Art, Inc. a field guide to the psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist 

Having a productive mindset, and defining the success of a finished piece of art in both aesthetic and commercial terms, is an excellent goal to strive for. So many of us struggle with granting ourselves permission to be an artist. If you’re doing the same, let me fix that for you. Do you want to be an artist? Yes? Congratulations, you’re now an artist. Now go make your art.

12 August 2014 ·

deviantart:

Artists are always on the lookout for tutorials. So, we thought it’d be a good idea to compile these resources in our Artist’s Toolbox. 

deviantart:

Artists are always on the lookout for tutorials. So, we thought it’d be a good idea to compile these resources in our Artist’s Toolbox

(via art-and-sterf)

7 August 2014 ·

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - STRAIGHT against CURVESThis principle really helps to create shapes and characters with “points of interest”. The straights move the eye towards the areas of curves, bumps and details. I mostly focused on the silhouettes of the shapes/characters, but the same principles should also be applied to shapes and volumes inside the main shape/volume.Norm

Great explanation/illustration of a cartooning principle that is difficult to explain.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - STRAIGHT against CURVES

This principle really helps to create shapes and characters with “points of interest”. The straights move the eye towards the areas of curves, bumps and details. I mostly focused on the silhouettes of the shapes/characters, but the same principles should also be applied to shapes and volumes inside the main shape/volume.

Norm

Great explanation/illustration of a cartooning principle that is difficult to explain.

(via art-and-sterf)

6 August 2014 ·

solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(
Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!

Love your art, love yourself!

Great advice.

(via webcomicdojo)

21 July 2014 ·

Who?

Scott Marshall is a writer/artist based in Kingston, ON.

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